ALD-52

ALD-52

ALD-52

Psychoactive Research chemicals are new synthetic substances that are structurally similar to the original drug, while being functional analogs. Research on the effects of, and treatment for, abuse of these drugs is limited due to the fact that they’re fairly new and have avoided mainstream notice. Research chemicals do not have a lot of human consumption data, and thus harm-reduction and special care should be taken if choosing to ingest them.

Psychedelics are drugs which cause profound changes in a one’s perceptions of reality, otherwise known as hallucinations. While under the influence of hallucinogens, users might see images, hear sounds or feel sensations. These chemicals offer some of the most intense psychological experiences and care should be taken when ingesting them.

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Description

ALD-52

Also known as:

  • (8β)-1-Acetyl-N,N-diethyl-6-methyl-9,10-didehydroergolin-8-carboxamid[German][ACD/IUPAC Name]
  • (8β)-1-Acetyl-N,N-diethyl-6-methyl-9,10-didehydroergoline-8-carboxamide[ACD/IUPAC Name]
  • (8β)-1-Acétyl-N,N-diéthyl-6-méthyl-9,10-didéhydroergoline-8-carboxamide[French][ACD/IUPAC Name]
  • 1-ACETYLLYSERGIC ACID DIETHYLAMIDE
  • Ergoline-8-carboxamide, 1-acetyl-9,10-didehydro-N,N-diethyl-6-methyl-, (8β)-
  • Ergoline-8-carboxamide, 1-acetyl-9,10-didehydro-N,N-diethyl-6-methyl-, (8β)-[ACD/Index Name]
  • Ergoline-8β-carboxamide, 1-acetyl-9,10-didehydro-N,N-diethyl-6-methyl-
  • (+)-Lysergic acid acetyldiethylamide
  • [(1R,5S)-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octan-3-yl] 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)acetate
  • 08/02/3270
  • 4-25-00-00972 (Beilstein Handbook Reference)[Beilstein]
  • D-1-Acetyl lysergic acid diethylamide
  • Ergoline-8-carboxamide, 1-acetyl-9,10-didehydro-N,N-diethyl-6-methyl-, (8-β)-
  • Lysergamide, 1-acetyl-N,N-diethyl- (6CI,7CI)

ALD-52, or N-acetyl-LSD is a less common chemical analogue of LSD, first synthesised by Albert Hoffman. It was famously implicated in the ‘Orange Sunshine’ trial. A psychedelic lysergamide, this compound exhibits similar properties to LSD, and is thought to be a pro-drug for LSD.

Summary

It is structurally related to psychedelic lysergamides like LSD and 1P-LSD and is reported to produce largely indistinguishable effects. ALD-52 was originally discovered by in his study of LSD analogs, but it did not enter mainstream awareness until the 1960s Western youth counterculture. ALD-52 gained public notoriety when it was supposedly distributed as LSD in the 1960s under the now-famous name "Orange Sunshine.

" This was later disproven (see section below). Alexander Shulgin touches briefly on the subject of ALD-52 in the commentary section of LSD-25 in the book TiHKAL (“Tryptamines I have Known and Loved”). His writings are based on second-hand accounts which state that doses in the 50-175 µg range result in various effects that are not particularly distinct from LSD.

His reports indicate that it produces less visual distortion than with LSD as well as less anxiety and tenseness, while also being somewhat less potent than LSD. Another report found the two substances to be indistinguishable. As with LSD itself, ALD-52 does not meet the criteria to be considered addictive or toxic by the scientific community.

Nevertheless, unpredictable adverse reactions such as anxiety, paranoia, delusions and psychosis are always possible, particularly among those who are predisposed to psychiatric disorders. While these negative reactions or “bad trips” can often be attributed to factors like user inexperience or improper preparation of set and setting, they are known to happen spontaneously among even highly experienced users as well. It is highly advised to approach this very potent, long-lasting hallucinogenic substance with the proper amount of preparation, and harm reduction practices if using it.

History

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In 1968 and 1969, a famous batch of LSD known as “Orange Sunshine” was synthesized by Nick Sands and Tim Scully and made widely available in California. This “Orange Sunshine” was long held by the hippie generation to be ALD-52 until 2005, when it was revealed by Nick Sands that “Orange Sunshine” was just a particularly well made batch of LSD dosed at 300 micrograms per unit. This was confirmed by Tim Scully in a 2017 Reddit AMA, where Scully explained that the claim that “Orange Sunshine” was technically not LSD arose from an “ill-advised desperate defense strategy that failed miserably” during his trial for LSD manufacture.

Chemistry

ALD-52

ALD-52

ALD-52 is a substituted derivative of lysergic acid.

ALD-52’s structure contains four rings, a bicyclic hexahydroindole fused to a bicyclic quinoline group.

This core structure of ALD-52 is an ergoline derivative, and has tryptamine and phenethylamine structures embedded within it.

ALD-52 contains a N,N-diethylcarboxamide functional group bound to R8 of the chemical structure.

It is additionally substituted at carbon 6 with a methyl group. ALD-52 is homologous to 1P-LSD, which contains a propionyl group bound to CH3CO- instead of the acetyl group bound to the same location.

It is unknown how these differences account for differences in the two compound’s activity.

Common Name1-ACETYLLYSERGIC ACID DIETHYLAMIDE
Systematic name1-ACETYLLYSERGIC ACID DIETHYLAMIDE
FormulaC_{22}H_{27}N_{3}O_{2}
SMILESCCN(CC)C(=O)[[email protected]]1CN([[email protected]@H]2Cc3cn(c4c3c(ccc4)C2=C1)C(=O)C)C
Std. InChiInChI=1S/C22H27N3O2/c1-5-24(6-2)22(27)16-10-18-17-8-7-9-19-21(17)15(13-25(19)14(3)26)11-20(18)23(4)12-16/h7-10,13,16,20H,5-6,11-12H2,1-4H3/t16-,20-/m1/s1
Std. InChiKeyFJOWXGYLIWJFCH-OXQOHEQNSA-N
Avg. Mass365.4687 Da
Molecular Weight365.4687
Monoisotopic Mass365.210327 Da
Nominal Mass365
ChemSpider ID174121

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Dosing Guide

Oral
Light25-75ug
Common75-150ug
Strong150-300ug.

Duration

ALD-52 Duration Data
Onset45-90 minutes
Duration9-14 hours
After-effects12-24h

Interactions and Synergies

There are no existing interaction or synergy data for this drug.

General Information

Experiences
Oral
Vaporization
Come up
Dosage
Effectsvisual distortions, a sense of childlike wonder, brightening of colors,racing thoughts, hue shifts, euphoria, anxiety, confusion
After Effects
Avoidmarijuana (can potentiate effects)
Warning
Risks
Test Kits
Marguis Test Result
Tolerance
Detection
Half-life
Advice
Note
Note 2:
Note 3:

Effects

Pharmacological Effects

ALD-52 likely acts as a 5-HT2A partial agonist. The psychedelic effects are believed to come from ALD-52’s efficacy at the 5-HT2A receptors. However, the role of these interactions and how they result in the psychedelic experience continues to remain elusive. ALD-52, alongside with 1P-LSD, is believed to act as a prodrug to LSD, though it is unclear as to whether it is capable of exerting its own effects.

Subjective Effects

Anecdotal reports from many users suggest that the effects of ALD-52 are virtually identical to LSD. In comparison to other psychedelics such as psilocin, LSA and ayahuasca, ALD-52 is significantly more stimulating and fast-paced regarding the specific style of its physical and cognitive effects, as is the case with other lysergamides.

Physical Effects

  • Stimulation - In terms of its effects on the physical energy levels of the user, ALD-52 produces stimulating effects similar to LSD. This is in distinction to other, more commonly used psychedelics such as psilocybin which are more consistent in producing sedation and relaxedness.
  • Spontaneous physical sensations - The "body high" of ALD-52 can be characterized as proportionally very intense in comparison to its accompanying visual and cognitive effects. It behaves as a euphoric, fast-moving, sharp and location specific tingling sensation. For some, it is manifested spontaneously at different, unpredictable points throughout the trip, but for most, it maintains a steady presence that rises with the onset and hits its limit once the peak has been reached. At moderate to high doses of ALD-52, this sensation often approaches its highest level and can become so overwhelming that people may find themselves writhing on the floor in pleasure.
    • Physical euphoria - It should be noted that this effect is not as reliably induceable as it is with substances like stimulants or entactogens, and can just as easily manifest as physical discomfort without any apparent reason.
  • Tactile enhancement - Feelings of enhanced tactile sensations are consistently present at moderate levels throughout most ALD-52 trips. If level 8A geometry is reached, an intense sensation of suddenly becoming aware of and being able to feel every single nerve ending across a person's entire body all at once is consistently present.
  • Changes in felt bodily form - This effect is often accompanied by a sense of warmth or unity and usually occurs during and up to the peak of the experience or directly afterwards. Users can feel as if they are physically part of or conjoined with other objects. This is usually reported as feeling comfortable in its sensations and even peaceful.
  • Perception of bodily lightness
  • Nausea - Mild nausea is occasionally reported when consumed in moderate to high dosages and either passes instantly soon after the user has vomited or gradually fades by itself as the peak sets in.
  • Stamina enhancement - This is generally mild in comparison to the stamina enhancement produced by traditional stimulants.
  • Bodily control enhancement
  • Appetite suppression
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Increased heart rate
  • Increased perspiration
  • Muscle contractions
  • Muscle spasms
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Excessive yawning - This effect is significantly less pronounced than it is with psilocybin and its related compounds, the four-position substituted tryptamines.
  • Pupil dilation
  • Increased salivation
  • Seizure - Although no cases of ALD-52 induced seizures have been documented, it is likely to have a similar seizure risk as LSD. LSD is believed to lower the seizure threshold, although seizures are very rarely reported and believed to only be a risk to those who are predisposed to them, particularly in combination with physically taxing conditions such as dehydration, undernourishment, overheating, or general fatigue.

Psychological Effects

The cognitive effects of ALD-52 can be broken down into several components which progressively intensify proportional to dosage. In comparison to other psychedelics such as psilocybin, LSA and ayahuasca, ALD-52 is significantly more stimulating and fast-paced in terms of the specific style of thought streams produced and contains a large number of potential effects that is attributed to its binding activity at a wide range of monoamine receptors other than serotonin, specifically dopamine and norepinephrine. The most prominent of these cognitive effects generally include:

Visual Effects

Enhancements

Distortions

Geometry

The visual geometry encountered on ALD-52 can be described as more similar in appearance to that of 2C-B or 2C-I than psilocin, LSA or DMT. It can be comprehensively described through its variations as primarily intricate in complexity, algorithmic in form, unstructured in organization, brightly lit, colourful in scheme, synthetic in feel, multicoloured in scheme, flat in shading, sharp in edges, large in size, fast in speed, smooth in motion, angular in its corners, non-immersive in-depth and consistent in intensity.

In the case of higher level geometry, this substance is level 8A dominant but is also capable of inducing 8B Geometry under the right circumstances.

Hallucinatory states

ALD-52 is capable of producing a full range of low and high level hallucinatory states in a fashion that is significantly less consistent and reproducible than that of many other commonly used psychedelics, specifically tryptamines like DMT or psilocybin mushrooms. These effects include:

Auditory Effects

Sensory Effects

  • Synaesthesia - In its fullest manifestation, this is a very rare and non-reproducible effect. Increasing the dosage can increase the likelihood of this occurring, but seems to only be a prominent part of the experience among those who are already predisposed to synaesthetic states.

Transpersonal Effects

Legal Status

ALD-52 is currently a gray area compound within many parts of the world. This means that it is not known to be specifically illegal within most countries, but people may still be charged for its possession under certain circumstances such as under analog laws and with the intent to sell or consume.

  • Austria: ALD-52 is technically not illegal but it may fall in the NPSG (Neue-Psychoaktive-Substanzen-Gesetz Österreich) as an analogue of LSD.
  • Denmark: ALD-52 is not listed as an illegal substance in Denmark, and its chemical class 'lysergamide' is not banned under the Analogue Act (Some LSD analogues are, however, prohibited).
  • Germany: ALD-52 is controlled under the NpSG (New Psychoactive Substances Act) as of July 18, 2019. Production and import with the aim to place it on the market, administration to another person and trading is punishable. Possession is illegal but not penalized.
  • Latvia: ALD-52 is illegal in Latvia. Although it isn't officially scheduled, it is controlled as an LSD structural analog due to an amendment made on June 1, 2015.
  • Poland: ALD-52 is a NPS class drug in Poland, making it illegal to possess or distribute.
  • United Kingdom: As of January 7, 2015, ALD-52 is specifically named in the U.K. Misuse of Drugs Act as a Class A controlled substance..
  • United States: ALD-52 is unscheduled in the United States. It may be considered an analogue of LSD, a Schedule I controlled substanceunder the Controlled Substances Act. As such, the sale for human consumption or the use for illicit non-medical or scientific research could be prosecuted as crimes under the Federal Analogue Act.

  • References

    1. Shulgin, Alexander; Shulgin, Ann (1997). "#26. LSD-25". TiHKAL: The Continuation. United States: Transform Press.  0-9630096-9-9. OCLC 38503252.
    2. Lüscher, Christian; Ungless, Mark A. (2006). "The Mechanistic Classification of Addictive Drugs". PLOS Medicine. 3 (11). :10.1371/journal.pmed.0030437.  1549-1277. PMID 17105338.
    3. Nichols, David E. (2016). Barker, Eric L., ed. "Psychedelics". Pharmacological Reviews. 68 (2): 264–355. :10.1124/pr.115.011478.  0031-6997.
    4. Strassmann, Rick (1984). "Adverse reactions to psychedelic drugs. A review of the literature". Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. 172 (10): 577–595. :10.1097/00005053-198410000-00001.  0022-3018. OCLC 1754691. PMID 6384428.
    5. "Earth"; "Jon Hanna"; "Spoon" (March 14, 2016). "Ask Erowid : ID 3189 : Was Orange Sunshine actually ALD-52?". Erowid. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
    6. Armstrong, B. D.; Paik, E.; Chhith, S.; Lelievre, V.; Waschek, J. A.; Howard, S. G. (2004). "Potentiation of (DL)‐3,4‐methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)‐induced toxicity by the serotonin 2A receptior partial agonist d‐lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), and the protection of same by the serotonin 2A/2C receptor antagonist MDL 11,939". Neuroscience Research Communications. 35 (2): 83–95. :10.1002/nrc.20023.  1520-6769.
    7. Gudelsky, Gary A.; Yamamoto, Bryan; Nash, J. Frank (1994). "Potentiation of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-induced dopamine release and serotonin neurotoxicity by 5-HT2 receptor agonists". European Journal of Pharmacology. 264 (3): 325–330. :10.1016/0014-2999(94)90669-6.  0014-2999.
    8. Capela, J. P.; Fernandes, E.; Remião, F.; Bastos, M. L.; Meisel, A.; Carvalho, F. (2007). "Ecstasy induces apoptosis via 5-HT2A-receptor stimulation in cortical neurons". Neurotoxicology. 28 (4): 868–875. :10.1016/j.neuro.2007.04.005.  0161-813X. PMID 17572501.
    9. Passie, T.; Halpern, J. H.; Stichtenoth, D. O.; Emrich, H. M.; Hintzen, A. "The Pharmacology of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide: A Review" (PDF). CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics. 14: 295–314. :10.1111/j.1755-5949.2008.00059.x.  1755-5930. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 1, 2013. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
    10. Talaie, H.; Panahandeh, R.; Fayaznouri, M. R.; Asadi, Z.; Abdollahi, M. (2009). "Dose-independent occurrence of seizure with tramadol". Journal of Medical Toxicology. 5 (2): 63–67. :10.1007/BF03161089.  1556-9039.
    11. "Samlet liste over euforiserende stoffer opført på bilag 1 til bekendtgørelsen om euforiserende stoffer nr. 557 af 31. maj 2011 og stoffer reguleret herefter via ændringsbekendtgørelser" (in Danish). Lægemiddelstyrelsen [Danish Medicines Agency]. June 13, 2018. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
    12. "Anlage NpSG" (in German). Bundesministerium der Justiz und für Verbraucherschutz [Federal Ministry of Justice and Consumer Protection]. Retrieved December 10, 2019.
    13. "Verordnung zur Änderung der Anlage des Neue-psychoaktive-Stoffe-Gesetzes und von Anlagen des Betäubungsmittelgesetzes" (PDF). Bundesgesetzblatt Jahrgang 2019 Teil I Nr. 27 (in German). Bundesanzeiger Verlag. July 17, 2019. pp. 1083–1094. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
    14. "§ 4 NpSG" (in German). Bundesministerium der Justiz und für Verbraucherschutz [Federal Ministry of Justice and Consumer Protection]. Retrieved December 10, 2019.
    15. "Noteikumi par Latvijā kontrolējamajām narkotiskajām vielām, psihotropajām vielām un prekursoriem" (in Latvian). VSIA Latvijas Vēstnesis. November 10, 2005. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
    16. "Rozporządzenie Ministra zdrowia z dnia 21 sierpnia 2019 r. zmieniające rozporządzenie w sprawie wykazu substancji psychotropowych, środków odurzających oraz nowych substancji psychoaktywnych" (PDF) (in Polish).
    17. Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (June 10, 2014). "Update of the generic definition for tryptamines" (PDF). Government Digital Service. p. 12. Retrieved January 1, 2020.

    Sources

    Information made possible with:

    1. PsychonautWiki is a community-driven online encyclopedia that aims to document the field of psychonautics in a comprehensive, scientifically-grounded manner.
    2. Erowid is a non-profit educational & harm-reduction resource with 60 thousand pages of online information about psychoactive drugs
    3. PubChem National Center for Bio Informatics
    4. Chemspider is a free chemical structure database providing fast access to over 34 million structures, properties and associated information.
    5. Wikipedia

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